Jayne Miller

Jayne is TeleGeography's Content Marketing Manager.

Recent Posts

Google and Facebook Have Joined the Pacific Light Cable Project

Perhaps you've heard that Google and Facebook have joined the Pacific Light Cable Project.

We've compiled several resources to explain why content providers are getting into the cable game. (And we also have some insight on the cable in question.)

What is the Nyquist Theorem and Why Does it Matter?

It’s a good week to celebrate math and science.

Building the Local Exchange of Content in Africa: Dispatches from AfPIF

For the Internet Society (ISOC), the goal is 80/20 by 2020 in Africa.

The Best Tweets from WAN Summit Singapore

This week was big. We put another WAN Summit in the books, taking the show to Singapore for the first time ever.

IP Transit vs. Peering: How a Network of Networks is Built

What does the Internet look like? Perhaps you’ve heard it described as a veritable network of networks.

While this is true, as TeleGeography’s Senior Analyst Paul Brodsky explains, no single network is big enough to connect every single person and every single computer. So the question remains: how are we really staying connected?

TG Interview: Taking the WAN Summit to Singapore

After a successful three-year run in New York and London, next week the TeleGeography team heads to Singapore for the first-ever WAN Summit Singapore.

4 Telecoms Articles You Should Read This Weekend

If you’re like us, you’ve saved the best stuff on the Internet for some lazy weekend reading. Our team has four suggestions for telecoms pieces that'll make your morning coffee and your reading queue a little more interesting.

Bandwidth Prices Are Eroding, Volume is Growing, and The Market Spins Madly On

Content network operators account for a growing portion of bandwidth on global routes.

Perhaps by now you’ve read what companies like Google, Microsoft, and Facebook are doing about it: they’re taking primary ownership shares of transoceanic systems, joining consortia, and taking major stakes in carrier-owned cables.

The Truth About Digital Traffic Jams

If you've ever seen that little buffer symbol on your laptop screen as you wait for a movie to load, you know what digital traffic jams feel like.

What's the Difference Between the World Wide Web and the Internet?

Happy Internaut Day! On August 23, 1991, users accessed the World Wide Web for the first time, paving the way for the internet that we turn to for the latest and greatest cat gifs.

So here's a question: what's the difference between the World Wide Web and the internet?