Internet

Another Submarine Cable Story is Being Written. (This One is 14,000 Kilometers Long.)

What articles have we been Slacking to one another around the office? This month that list includes a story about a new cable project that has two very big backers: Facebook and Amazon. The Jupiter cable will connect the U.S. and Asia by 2020. You can read all about it in the story by the BBC below.

The other stories we've rounded up include mergers, takeovers, and shakeups. Plus, more news on T-Mobile's ever-growing presence in the U.S. wireless market.

Island Hopping: Five Ways Melanesia's Telecom Markets are Evolving

TeleGeography’s GlobalComms Database includes comprehensive coverage of the world’s major telecom markets.

But we also profile some of the smallest principalities, republics, and territories in the world.

This month we focus our attention on Melanesia, the sub-region of Oceania that encompasses the independent island nations of Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu, as well as the French special collectivity of New Caledonia.

A Complete List of Content Providers' Submarine Cable Holdings

In the words of TeleGeography's Director of Colocation Research Jon Hjembo"Content is driving everything and that’s one of the biggest trends that we’re watching right now."

[Webinar] Making Sense of SDN, SD-WAN, and NFV in the WAN

Got questions about SD-WAN? Lots of people do. If you're one of them, you might like to join this webinar happening November 21 at 10 a.m. EST.

Stranger Things: Why Netflix Isn’t Behind New Submarine Cable Builds

Besides sharks eating undersea cables, one of the biggest myths that I’ve seen recently is Netflix being cited alongside Google, Facebook, and Microsoft as a contributor to new submarine cable investment.

This Blog Post Has Everything: Robots! North Korea! Cloud Computing!

This month we're reading about the state of artificial intelligence, connectivity in North Korea, content providers' submarine cables, and the curious new way Amazon Web Services will be charging customers. (A TeleGeography lineup if I've ever seen one.)

We've got all the stories linked below. Have at it.

Iraq and Roll: Telecoms in Kurdistan

The Iraqi region of Kurdistan recently voted overwhelmingly in favor of independence.

While the political machinations will continue for some time—with Iraq, Iran, and Turkey all having spoken out against the prospect of an independent Kurdish state—the vote has prompted us to take a closer look at the region’s telecoms markets.

How T-Mobile U.S. Ripped Up the Rulebook and Doubled its Subscriber Base in Four Years

In recent years, the stand-out performer in the ultra-competitive U.S. mobile market has been T-Mobile, which has more than doubled its subscriber base to almost 70 million since March 2013.

Optical Illusions: Content Providers and the Impending Transformation of International Transport

This week TeleGeography VP of Research Tim Stronge made his way to San Jose to speak at NANOG 71.

His session covered the relationship between international transport and content provider demand and the way in which content providers are changing international transport prices.

You Can Never Have Too Much Bandwidth

When our VP of Strategy Stephan Beckert agreed to sit in the hot seat for this month's Spotlight, I knew I wanted to ask him about the state of the global internet.

Where are new cables? Who is investing in them? What do they mean? The internet is growing, right? How are content providers contributing to this story?