Network

This Blog Post Has Everything: Robots! North Korea! Cloud Computing!

This month we're reading about the state of artificial intelligence, connectivity in North Korea, content providers' submarine cables, and the curious new way Amazon Web Services will be charging customers. (A TeleGeography lineup if I've ever seen one.)

We've got all the stories linked below. Have at it.

Iraq and Roll: Telecoms in Kurdistan

The Iraqi region of Kurdistan recently voted overwhelmingly in favor of independence.

While the political machinations will continue for some time—with Iraq, Iran, and Turkey all having spoken out against the prospect of an independent Kurdish state—the vote has prompted us to take a closer look at the region’s telecoms markets.

How T-Mobile U.S. Ripped Up the Rulebook and Doubled its Subscriber Base in Four Years

In recent years, the stand-out performer in the ultra-competitive U.S. mobile market has been T-Mobile, which has more than doubled its subscriber base to almost 70 million since March 2013.

Watch the Webinar: 5 Things We Learned About Sub Cable Route Diversity in the Asia-Pacific Region

Earlier this week our own Alan Mauldin teamed up with Ciena’s Brian Lavallée to discuss submarine cable trends in the Asia-Pacific region. Here's what we learned from the experts.

Staying Connected in the Aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, Irma

How do telecom companies keep communities connected and support recovery efforts after storms like Harvey and Irma?

Our reading list this month is full of pieces that ask this question. Our picks cover the use of drones to determine routes for bringing equipment to storm-affected areas. There's also an article about contingency plans for a major data center in Irma's path.

We're also sharing a great read about rural America's access to broadband internet. You can find all of these September selections below. 

Island Hopping: Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, and American Samoa

TeleGeography’s GlobalComms Database includes comprehensive coverage of the world’s major telecoms markets—but we also profile some of the smallest principalities, republics, and territories in the world.

Here’s another peek at what’s happening in three unique island markets.

[Webinar] Keep Your Options Open: Submarine Route Diversity

With over 99 percent of the world’s intercontinental communications traffic flowing over submarine cables, increased route diversity has become a critical requirement.

Ensuring that the growing amount of traffic carried over the global internet remains available at all times is crucial.

More Cables Will Connect Brazil and the U.S. This Year. That’s Actually a Big Deal.

This month we’ll see the first direct fiber optic route between São Paulo and New York—the Seabras-1. (The final splice was reported in July.)

So why does this matter? Lots of new cables are in the works. In fact, Latin America itself is going through a submarine cable boom.

How Submarine Cables are Keeping Trains (and Planes!) Running on Time

No one likes a delayed flight, much less a canceled one. But that's exactly what happened in Pakistan following a drastic slowdown of the internet, which was the result of a submarine cable fault. 

We've been reading up on this story, as well as a new study about victims of DDoS attacks, spectrum in South Africa, and mobile disruptor Reliance Jio Infocomm. Scope out our reading list below.

Three Facts That Summarize the Current Global Wholesale Bandwidth Market

We've been tracking the market for long-haul networks and submarine cables since 1999. Our data documents the tectonic shift from submarine cable consortium owners to private builders and the eventual tech bubble burst.

But what does the global wholesale bandwidth market look like today?

We pulled three facts out of our Global Bandwidth Research Service to paint a picture.