Submarine Cables

Bandwidth Prices Are Eroding, Volume is Growing, and The Market Spins Madly On

Content network operators account for a growing portion of bandwidth on global routes.

Perhaps by now you’ve read what companies like Google, Microsoft, and Facebook are doing about it: they’re taking primary ownership shares of transoceanic systems, joining consortia, and taking major stakes in carrier-owned cables.

Are All These New Undersea Cables Really Giving Us Faster Internet? Not Exactly.

How many times have we heard that new undersea cables will bring consumers Internet speeds faster than a speeding bullet? (Like this or this or this.)

It has been reported that new cables promise speeds up to 10 million times faster than traditional home cable modems.

But here’s the kicker: there is no increased speed to be found in these submarine cable systems.

The Scoop on Google's New Subsea Cable (And What it Means for Future Capacity Investments)

Google has joined a handful of carriers to complete a brand new Trans-Pacific oceanic cable – but this is hardly their first venture under the sea.

Mythbusters: Revenge of the Cable Myths, Part III

In Part II of TeleGeography's Mythbusters presentation at SubOptic 2016, Alan Mauldin busted five myths that ranged from whether capacity demand is doubling every two years to a quote from the movie Gravity that the destruction of a single satelite would lead to half of North America "losing their Facebook." In the concluding part of this series, Tim Stronge returns to the stage to take on myths about energy costs pushing decisions about content providers' data center locations, multiple parties building on the same route and "adult" content driving most Internet traffic. 

Mythbusters: Revenge of the Cable Myths, Part II

In the first part of TeleGeography’s Mythbusters presentation at SubOptic 2016, Tim Stronge busted myths about NSA Surveillance, decreases in connectivity to the United States and shark attacks on the internet. In Part II, Alan Mauldin investigates whether submarine cable capacity is doubling every two years, if content providers really need fiber pairs everywhere, if the global network is more resilient than ever before, whether Netflix has huge subsea capacity requirements and the possibility that the destruction of a single satelite would cause half of North America to "lose their Facebook". 

Mythbusters: Revenge of the Cable Myths, Part I

TeleGeography’s Tim Stronge and Alan Mauldin returned to the triennial SubOptic conference this year to deliver a follow-up to their popular and humorous submarine cable mythbusting master class from the 2013 event. In just over an hour, Tim and Alan “exploded” eleven of the most prevalent myths about the submarine cable industry. To cover the scope of the master class, we’ll be recapping the entire presentation over the course of a three-part blog series.

[Webinar] Land Ho! Connecting Data Centers Under the Sea

If you missed the live TeleGeography and Ciena webinar, "Land Ho! Connecting Data Centers under the Sea" on June 22, 2016, you can watch a recording of the webinar on demand, or download the presentation slide deck, here. Join Paul Brodsky, Senior Analyst with TeleGeography, and Brian Lavallée, Director of Solutions Marketing from Ciena, for a discussion about the impact of shifts in private vs. Internet network bandwidth consumption are having on transoceanic DCI, and the technology and strategies that will keep both submarine and data center operators ahead of the curve when managing their traffic flows.

Rising Tide: Content Providers' Investment in Submarine Cables Continues

Yesterday Facebook, Microsoft, Telefonica’s Telxius group announced they are investing in a new trans-Atlantic submarine cable. The MAREA cable will take a unique path from Virginia Beach, USA to Bilboa, Spain. This system will be the third new trans-Atlantic system, following the launch of Hibernia Express last fall and AEConnect earlier this year.

A New Submarine Cable Construction Boom in Latin America

TeleGeography recently traveled to Rio de Janeiro to attend Capacity Latin America, where I moderated the panel “Laying the Foundation – Building the Necessary Steps to Encourage Future Investments in the Latin American Region.” My colleagues and I had the chance to catch up with players across the submarine cable industry to identify the most important trends in the Latin American market. One of the key takeaways from discussions we had at the conference was the re-emergence of a submarine cable construction boom.

Connected by a Thread

As kids, many of us attached a pair of tin cans to the ends of a long string to create a primitive telephone. Somewhat ironically, modern global telecommunications still functions in a somewhat similar manner.