Video

Submarine Cables: Are We in a New Bubble?

We went 12 years without building a new cable in the Atlantic. In the last two years we've seen two builds, another announced, and more planned.

This might be why our VP of Research Tim Stronge recently asked a group of PTC 2017 attendees if we're in a submarine cable bubble.

Another Bandwidth and IP Pricing Trends in 15 Minutes

If we take a closer look at 365 days of global bandwidth and IP pricing, what do we actually see?

If you've got 15 minutes to spare, Brianna Boudreau will show you.

The Colocation Sector: Shifting Dynamics, Stable Fundamentals

There's no doubt that we've seen shifts in the colocation landscape as of late.

Content providers are moving closer to the network edge. There's been fast growth in certain Asian markets. And in the last two years about 20 new local internet exchanges have been deployed globally. 

The Best Telecoms Stuff We Wrote About in 2016

We had a good time combining our research, the latest headlines, and a hearty dose of telecoms history in our blog this year. 

Here's a look back at 10 of our favorite pieces from 2016. 

Flashback Friday: An Underwater Cable of 1939

When it comes to undersea cables, we've come a long way.

Take this 1939 Bell Systems reel, which showcases scenes from the San Francisco Harbor, as workmen ready submarine telephone cable that is to live at the bottom of the San Francisco Bay, winding beneath the Bay Bridge.

Carriers Review Their Network Roadmaps, Examine Customer Needs

Enterprise customers' expectations of their network are changing.

Webinar: Multi-Terabit Submarine Cables…Too Big to Fail?

Watch on demand now 

Submarine networks became critical infrastructure long ago.

A subsea cable fault that interrupts 120 Gb/s traffic is a bad thing. But a fault that interrupts tens of terabits of traffic is quite another.

Mythbusters: Revenge of the Cable Myths, Part III

In Part II of TeleGeography's Mythbusters presentation at SubOptic 2016, Alan Mauldin busted five myths that ranged from whether capacity demand is doubling every two years to a quote from the movie Gravity that the destruction of a single satelite would lead to half of North America "losing their Facebook." In the concluding part of this series, Tim Stronge returns to the stage to take on myths about energy costs pushing decisions about content providers' data center locations, multiple parties building on the same route and "adult" content driving most Internet traffic. 

SD-WAN: Intuit Offers a Case Study in How to Manage the Migration

While the potential benefits of incorporating software defined wide area networking (SD-WAN) are clear, there is no single migration path. At the WAN Summit New York, Intuit Principal Network Architect Manish Gupta offers lessons from his organization's experiences adopting SD-WAN and how they transformed their network architecture. Or in Gupta's own words: “I think we know why we’re moving there... But the question is: How are we getting there?”

Mythbusters: Revenge of the Cable Myths, Part II

In the first part of TeleGeography’s Mythbusters presentation at SubOptic 2016, Tim Stronge busted myths about NSA Surveillance, decreases in connectivity to the United States and shark attacks on the internet. In Part II, Alan Mauldin investigates whether submarine cable capacity is doubling every two years, if content providers really need fiber pairs everywhere, if the global network is more resilient than ever before, whether Netflix has huge subsea capacity requirements and the possibility that the destruction of a single satelite would cause half of North America to "lose their Facebook".