Submarine Cables

Another Submarine Cable Story is Being Written. (This One is 14,000 Kilometers Long.)

What articles have we been Slacking to one another around the office? This month that list includes a story about a new cable project that has two very big backers: Facebook and Amazon. The Jupiter cable will connect the U.S. and Asia by 2020. You can read all about it in the story by the BBC below.

The other stories we've rounded up include mergers, takeovers, and shakeups. Plus, more news on T-Mobile's ever-growing presence in the U.S. wireless market.

Island Hopping: Five Ways Melanesia's Telecom Markets are Evolving

TeleGeography’s GlobalComms Database includes comprehensive coverage of the world’s major telecom markets.

But we also profile some of the smallest principalities, republics, and territories in the world.

This month we focus our attention on Melanesia, the sub-region of Oceania that encompasses the independent island nations of Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu, as well as the French special collectivity of New Caledonia.

A Complete List of Content Providers' Submarine Cable Holdings

In the words of TeleGeography's Director of Colocation Research Jon Hjembo"Content is driving everything and that’s one of the biggest trends that we’re watching right now."

Stranger Things: Why Netflix Isn’t Behind New Submarine Cable Builds

Besides sharks eating undersea cables, one of the biggest myths that I’ve seen recently is Netflix being cited alongside Google, Facebook, and Microsoft as a contributor to new submarine cable investment.

This Blog Post Has Everything: Robots! North Korea! Cloud Computing!

This month we're reading about the state of artificial intelligence, connectivity in North Korea, content providers' submarine cables, and the curious new way Amazon Web Services will be charging customers. (A TeleGeography lineup if I've ever seen one.)

We've got all the stories linked below. Have at it.

Watch the Webinar: 5 Things We Learned About Sub Cable Route Diversity in the Asia-Pacific Region

Earlier this week our own Alan Mauldin teamed up with Ciena’s Brian Lavallée to discuss submarine cable trends in the Asia-Pacific region. Here's what we learned from the experts.

Staying Connected in the Aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, Irma

How do telecom companies keep communities connected and support recovery efforts after storms like Harvey and Irma?

Our reading list this month is full of pieces that ask this question. Our picks cover the use of drones to determine routes for bringing equipment to storm-affected areas. There's also an article about contingency plans for a major data center in Irma's path.

We're also sharing a great read about rural America's access to broadband internet. You can find all of these September selections below. 

[Webinar] Keep Your Options Open: Submarine Route Diversity

With over 99 percent of the world’s intercontinental communications traffic flowing over submarine cables, increased route diversity has become a critical requirement.

Ensuring that the growing amount of traffic carried over the global internet remains available at all times is crucial.

How Submarine Cables are Keeping Trains (and Planes!) Running on Time

No one likes a delayed flight, much less a canceled one. But that's exactly what happened in Pakistan following a drastic slowdown of the internet, which was the result of a submarine cable fault. 

We've been reading up on this story, as well as a new study about victims of DDoS attacks, spectrum in South Africa, and mobile disruptor Reliance Jio Infocomm. Scope out our reading list below.

Three Facts That Summarize the Current Global Wholesale Bandwidth Market

We've been tracking the market for long-haul networks and submarine cables since 1999. Our data documents the tectonic shift from submarine cable consortium owners to private builders and the eventual tech bubble burst.

But what does the global wholesale bandwidth market look like today?

We pulled three facts out of our Global Bandwidth Research Service to paint a picture.