Wan

Hypothetical Network Series #5: Let’s Throw Bandwidth at the Problem

So far, we’ve looked at several more conservative approaches to constructing a hybrid WAN.

But what if we went all the way down the rabbit hole to an all Internet WAN?

For example, throwing a lot of bandwidth at the network and letting SD-WAN take care of the internet performance.

Orchestrating the Service Lifecycle

In 2021, MEF CTO Pascal Menezes walked us through the work MEF is doing on standardizing the enterprise network.

Nearly a year and a half later, Pascal is back on the pod to discuss what MEF has been doing since then.

Our first topic: Lifecycle Service Orchestration. What is it, how has it progressed, and what does it do for the carrier community?

Sizing the WAN Market

As the WAN continues to evolve at warp speed, carriers, vendors, and enterprise IT infrastructure teams need to understand how these changes will affect the business of telecom.

That’s where our WAN Market Size Report comes in. With its data-driven model, this tool can provide a granular view down to the country level of the market opportunity for the underlay network or corporate WAN. 

Want a sample from our latest report? Just keep reading.

Embracing Carrier Service Automation

This week, with the help of Jeremy Villalobos, COO of Orchest (formerly known as GoldConnect), TeleGeography Explains the Internet tackles automation from a carrier perspective.

Hypothetical Network Series #4: Adapting to Remote Work

The COVID-19 pandemic fundamentally changed the way we work. And our next scenario illustrates the reality that many IT infrastructure managers are currently facing.

(If you're new here, check out the first post in this series first.)

A large portion of the workforce is now remote at least part of the week. When employees are in the office, they continue to utilize bandwidth-hungry applications like Zoom, Microsoft Teams, and Google Meet to stay connected.

As such, many enterprises are thinking of consolidating the number of sites they have—while increasing bandwidth in those that remain open—in an effort to save money.

Key Findings From Our Latest WAN Market Size Report

After tracking the WAN market size in 2020 and 2021 with our WAN Market Size Report, we began to think beyond the market as it is today.

What if we could predict what the future of the WAN market would hold?

Unraveling the Fabric Providers of Reality

This week, we're talking about NaaS.

Sure, we've covered NaaS in various contexts on TeleGeography Explains the Internet, but this episode focuses on fabric providers and where they're headed.

For that, we're so glad to have on our outspoken and super knowledgeable friend Michael Wynston, Director of Network Security Architecture & Automation at Fiserv.

Hypothetical Network Series #3: BYOB Internet WAN

So far, we’ve looked at integrating DIA and business broadband into a hybrid WAN. But there are a host of other network services that corporate networks teams have employed in their network transformations.

Our next scenario represents an Internet-first WAN with data center sites, a BYOB (bring your own backbone), if you will.

This customer may be someone with their own servers looking to build a fiber loop around the globe to connect them, even if they are at a neutral facility. 

Unpacking Network Observability

If you want to do a proper review of the state of the corporate WAN—in light of digital transformation, cloud, SD-WAN adoption, and MPLS utilization—there's no one better to talk to than Phil Gervasi, Director of Technical Evangelism at Kentik.

Lucky for me, he was this week's guest on TeleGeography Explains the Internet.

Hypothetical Network Series #2: Tiered Sites Approach

Use of the internet in corporate WANs is quickly growing. And for good reason.

Not only are internet services such as DIA and broadband cheaper than MPLS, many of the SaaS applications and cloud services that enterprises have adopted have been optimized to work over local internet connections rather than through central internet breakouts.

In addition, SD-WAN has emerged as a tool that allows WAN managers to incorporate these lower cost internet services into their network without sacrificing performance or security. But not every network site (or enterprise customer) is a good fit for an all internet WAN.

In our next two scenarios, we take an approach that we see many enterprises taking—designating network sites into tiers and assigning different network services to each tier. This allows companies to add in local internet breakouts at most offices, but keep some MPLS at higher priority sites that need service level assurances.