Greg Bryan

Greg is Senior Manager, Enterprise Research at TeleGeography. He's spent the last decade and a half at TeleGeography developing many of our pricing products and reports about enterprise networks. He is a frequent speaker at conferences about corporate wide area networks and enterprise telecom services. He also hosts the WAN Manager Podcast.

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Recent Posts

SASE and Secure

This week on TeleGeography Explains the Internet we welcome Jeremiah Ginn, Software Defined Cybersecurity Evangelist at AT&T and author of Diving into SASE.

A Brief History of Networking as a Service

This week's guest on TeleGeography Explains the Internet has a deep history in networking.

Khalid Raza was involved in some of the earliest large-scale MPLS deployments. Then, after seeing the limitations of MPLS, he co-founded Viptela–diving head-first into the SD-WAN revolution.

Khalid is now the Founder and CEO of Graphiant, a Silicon Valley-based startup. In this interview, he describes how enterprise networks have changed and why we need an approach beyond MPLS and SD-WAN.

Let’s Dive Into SASE

If you've been involved in the WAN/IT infrastructure space for the past few years, you've probably heard about SASE, or Secure Access Service Edge.

The enterprise market is just beginning to integrate this new technology into network security strategy and many professionals are still broadly unfamiliar with it. As a result, it's common for WAN speakers and writers to repeatedly clarify what SASE is (and speculate on whether vendors are “SASE washing”).

In fact, our 2021 WAN Manager Survey found that only one-third of enterprises had adopted either SASE or Zero Trust. And one in ten respondents had never even heard of SASE.

How Did We Forecast the WAN Market?

You may have heard that the WAN Market Size Report just got a brand-new feature—the WAN Market Size Report Forecast.

Predicting global, regional, and country level data for the next five years, this first edition takes the data from the 2021 report and extrapolates it to 2026.

Here's how we did it.

The Digital Divide Episode

James “Jim” Capuano has logged over 30 years in the telecommunications industry. And he's the CEO of Horizon, a service provider with more than 125 years of telecommunications experience.

I recently asked Jim to share some of his knowledge on TeleGeography Explains the Internet. In this episode, we view middle mile problems and solutions from a provider perspective and discuss how the middle mile is developing in the current WAN environment.

Orchestrating the Service Lifecycle

In 2021, MEF CTO Pascal Menezes walked us through the work MEF is doing on standardizing the enterprise network.

Nearly a year and a half later, Pascal is back on the pod to discuss what MEF has been doing since then.

Our first topic: Lifecycle Service Orchestration. What is it, how has it progressed, and what does it do for the carrier community?

Embracing Carrier Service Automation

This week, with the help of Jeremy Villalobos, COO of Orchest (formerly known as GoldConnect), TeleGeography Explains the Internet tackles automation from a carrier perspective.

Key Findings From Our Latest WAN Market Size Report

After tracking the WAN market size in 2020 and 2021 with our WAN Market Size Report, we began to think beyond the market as it is today.

What if we could predict what the future of the WAN market would hold?

Unraveling the Fabric Providers of Reality

This week, we're talking about NaaS.

Sure, we've covered NaaS in various contexts on TeleGeography Explains the Internet, but this episode focuses on fabric providers and where they're headed.

For that, we're so glad to have on our outspoken and super knowledgeable friend Michael Wynston, Director of Network Security Architecture & Automation at Fiserv.

Hypothetical Network Series #3: BYOB Internet WAN

So far, we’ve looked at integrating DIA and business broadband into a hybrid WAN. But there are a host of other network services that corporate networks teams have employed in their network transformations.

Our next scenario represents an Internet-first WAN with data center sites, a BYOB (bring your own backbone), if you will.

This customer may be someone with their own servers looking to build a fiber loop around the globe to connect them, even if they are at a neutral facility.