Paul Brodsky

Paul Brodsky is a Senior Research Manager at TeleGeography. He is part of the network, internet, cloud, and voice research team. His regional expertise includes Europe, Africa, and the Middle East.

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Recent Posts

The Factors Shaping Global Internet Development

The combined effects of new internet-enabled devices, growing broadband penetration in developing markets, higher broadband access rates, and bandwidth-intensive applications will continue to fuel strong internet traffic growth.

While end-user traffic requirements will continue to rise, not all of this demand will translate directly into the need for new long-haul capacity.

A variety of factors shape how the global internet will develop in coming years.

Measuring Provider Connectivity

If you want a single, simple number to identify the best-connected provider in the world, you may come away disappointed.

There are several ways to measure connectivity, and each highlights different strengths and weaknesses of a provider’s presence.

One basic metric is to count the number of unique Autonomous Systems (AS) to which a backbone provider connects, while filtering out internal company connections.

Here’s what we found.

Internet Traffic and Capacity Remain Brisk

The internet continues its return to normal—however one chooses to define this term—in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

With our newly updated Global Internet Geography Research Service,we conclude that the COVID-related expansion of internet traffic and bandwidth was largely a one-off phenomenon, and that the trends we had been observing in recent years have reasserted themselves.

International internet bandwidth and traffic growth have been gradually slowing in recent years, but they remain brisk.

Let's talk about that a bit.

Content Providers Binge on Global Bandwidth

Our newly updated Global Bandwidth Research Service shows that the global bandwidth market is still experiencing massive demand growth.

Between 2019 and 2021 alone, international bandwidth used by global networks doubled to reach nearly 2,900 Tbps.

So, who's driving all this demand growth for international capacity?

You Used To Call Me on My Work Phone

Not so long ago, tuning out a cacophony of ever-ringing desk phones was just part of the job for many office workers.

These days, that's no longer the norm. And it has nothing to do with the rise of wireless earbuds.

What's the Difference Between Traffic and Bandwidth?

If you find yourself questioning the difference between traffic and bandwidth, here's an analogy that will help. 

The Blue and Raman Cable Systems Stand Out. Here's Why.

It's likely that you've read the news by now. Google is teaming up with Telecom Italia Sparkle and others to build and operate two submarine cable systems linking the Middle East with southern Europe and India.

The Blue cable will connect Italy, France, Greece, Israel and go terrestrially to Jordan; while the Raman cable will connect Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Djibouti, Oman, and India. Combined, they will form a major new high-capacity route linking Europe and India.

Another day, another cable announcement involving a major content provider?

Yes and no.

International Bandwidth Soars to New Heights

With the annual update of our Global Bandwidth Research Service comes new insights for 2021.

Here's the big news: between 2018 and 2020 alone, international bandwidth used by global networks more than doubled to exceed 2,000 Tbps.

The COVID-19 Impact on International Calling

The global outbreak of COVID-19—and its associated economic and social impact—has upended the way billions of people live their lives.

Has it had an impact on international calling?

Internet Traffic and Capacity in Covid-Adjusted Terms

The global outbreak of COVID-19 and its associated economic and social impact has laid bare the crucial, irreplaceable role that the internet plays in our daily lives.

Starting in March 2020, internet traffic patterns shifted and volumes surged as students around the world learned from home, adults worked from home, and everybody did at least something from home.

To its enormous credit, the internet bent but—for the most part—did not break as network operators scrambled to deal with the swell in traffic.