Internet

You're Building a Submarine Cable Where?

It turns out that the Arctic isn't the easiest place to lay a cable.

Expensive and logistically challenging, Arctic cables are at the center of one of our recommended reads for this month. If you're up for a story that includes forged signatures, Arctic ambitions, and the dynamite quote, “The question is not why Elizabeth did it, but rather, how did she think she’d get away with it?”—then keep reading, my friends.

5G Rollouts Put the Pedal to the Metal

Lots of 5G news this week. Most notably, almost a quarter-billion new LTE connections were added worldwide in Q2 2019, according to 5G Americas.

You can read all about 5G mania below. There are also some worthy headlines about internet speeds, India's telecom battle, and a great interview between Recode's Kara Swisher and Huawei’s chief security officer in the U.S. Andy Purdy. 

Checking In: Yup. Price Erosion is Still Very Real.

IP transit prices vary across the globe, but they have one thing in common. They all decline.

In the last three years, some of the highest rates of price erosion occurred in markets with the greatest competition and the largest amount of international internet traffic exchange—namely, global hubs.

Today we're exploring some of the most notable examples of this.

Our 2019 Provider Connectivity Analysis is Here

TeleGeography's rankings of provider connectivity include analysis based on BGP routing tables, which govern how packets are delivered to their destinations across myriad networks as defined by autonomous system numbers (ASNs).

(Quick reminder: every network must rely on other networks to reach parts of the internet that it does not itself serve; there is no such thing as a ubiquitous internet backbone provider.)

466 Tbps: The Global Internet Continues to Expand

Global internet bandwidth rose last year by only 26%—the lowest annual growth rate seen in at least 15 years—and at a compound annual rate of 28% between 2015 and 2019.

Total international bandwidth now stands at 466 Tbps. The pace of growth is slowing, but it still represents a near-tripling of bandwidth since 2015.

How Do You Become Africa's Largest Telco?

For better or worse, MTN has been unafraid of doing business in locations experiencing war, political turmoil, and disaster.

This strategy has made them one of the biggest telcos in Africa—but it hasn't come without cost. The Wall Street Journal's recent profile earns the top spot on our list of monthly reads.

Some of the Biggest, Most Interesting Stories in Telecom Are Happening in Africa Right Now

When we look through some of the most interesting telecom stories from the last month, a theme emerges.

There's a lot of submarine cable and data center news coming out of Africa. 

We've selected stories about Facebook's plan to bring cheap internet to Africa, as well as a profile on Equiano, Google's new private subsea cable connecting Portugal and South Africa.

Will New Satellites End the Dominance of Submarine Cables?

There’s been a lot in the press recently about new low-orbit satellites. Rumors abound about content providers wanting to move their internet traffic off of the ocean floor and into space.

Going Where No Internet Has Gone Before

When you look to the night sky, do you think of the potential that satellites have to bring connectivity to geographies underserved by submarine cables? No?

Well maybe you will after reading one our recommended reads from PTC. This post unpacks the distribution of internet access across the world's population. There are still plenty of places that submarine cables don't reach, which makes satellites an appealing option for filling the void.

Are Content Providers The Biggest Investors in New Submarine Cables?

We’ve written quite a bit about content provider’s investments in new cables. And we’ve seen headlines about Microsoft, Google, Amazon, and Facebook’s big new investments. So does that mean that content providers are the largest investors in new submarine cables?