Internet

What is a Transport Network?

Welcome back to our five-part podcast special that literally explains how the internet you know and love works.

Last week we covered the most basic question: what is the internet?

Today, we tunnel deeper, exploring the physical transport networks behind this seemingly invisible, omnipresent information superhighway.

What is the Internet?

If you've caught TeleGeography's podcast, you'll know that we endeavor to explain the business behind human connection every week. We've chatted about Wi-Fi, WAN, and everything in between

We've audaciously called our show TeleGeography Explains the Internet, but we've never properly explained how the internet works and how bits get pushed around the globe. Until now.

That's right. We decided it was time to, quite literally, explain the internet.

Wi-Fi 6 Afraid of 7?

On TeleGeography Explains the Internet, we often focus on the long-haul, zeroing in on the network portion of telecoms. Today, with the help of Tiago Rodrigues, President and CEO of the Wireless Broadband Alliance (WBA), we’re switching things up a bit.

Drawing upon his vast expertise in the Wi-Fi space, Tiago steps into the hot seat to outline the key issues in the wireless LAN.

The State of the Network in 2024

Another lap around the sun, a new TeleGeography State of the Network Report—a tradition we’ve kept since 2017.

No seven-year itch for us, though; we’re just getting started. As the world of telecommunications continues to turn, each edition brings even more to report on than the last.

Watch Now: The Cloud Under the Sea

If you caught Research Director Alan Mauldin’s Submarine Networks World presentation this year, then you know how well-versed he is in submarine cable geopolitics (and in cable knowledge in general).

So you shouldn’t be surprised to see Alan sharing his expertise throughout ABC News’ exciting new submarine cable documentary, The Cloud Under the Sea.

This hour-long program “uncovers the shadowy world of telecommunication sea cables.” Watch it below.

The Data Center Industry Faces New Obstacles

Recently, we’ve been closely monitoring the intensifying pressures of insatiable demand and supply constraints in key data center markets.

Supply constraints have come in the form of both short-term and long-term challenges.

In the short term, supply chain disruptions have hindered development timelines. On the long-term side, regulators and utility providers have begun taking a hard look at the data center sector and how to grow it sustainably going forward. In some cases, these entities have severely disrupted development during the interim period.

None of these challenges have been resolved. And as we move through 2023, another major disruptive component has been added to the mix—the accelerated growth of generative Artificial Intelligence (AI).

What We’re Reading: Good News Edition

To spread some cheer and celebrate the beginning of the holiday season, we’re dubbing this month’s reading list the “good news edition.”

Here are three feel-good telecom headlines that you can be thankful for while waiting in line for those Black Friday deals.

Beware of Deep Fake TeleGeography

The age of generative AI is certainly exciting. The ability to quickly access answers to complex questions is poised to revolutionize the world. However, with great power comes great responsibility.  

When using these tools, it’s important to be mindful of some of the risks. Deep fakes are a growing concern for society at large and may have found their way to market research.

As we mentioned earlier this year, when it comes to submarine cable facts, AI may get some stuff right, but not everything.

In fact, you may be wondering, “does this mean there’s no need to subscribe to TeleGeography research anymore?” After all, can’t you just ask your favorite AI tool—whether it’s ChatGPT, Bard, etc.—to provide you with TeleGeography data?

I thought I’d ask Bard to show me some TeleGeography data. Are the results real or deep fakes? 

The Scary Truth About Space Junk

Need a last-minute idea for a Halloween costume contest? Try dressing up as space junk.

If anyone asks why your costume is so scary, tell them that according to NASA, “as of January 2022, the amount of material orbiting the Earth exceeded 9,000 metric tons.”

That’s over 19 million pounds of orbital debris—and a massive problem. However, the FCC has begun cracking down on the issue, recently issuing its first fine on the matter.

These Factors Will Influence the Development of the Global Internet

While artificial intelligence (AI) has been the most hyped demand driver in recent years, its impact on international internet capacity is not entirely clear.

A large amount of AI-driven demand is likely to be carried over the private networks of Google, Microsoft, Amazon, and Meta. Microsoft's infrastructure is also supporting OpenAI, the company behind ChatGPT.

Here are some other factors that will shape how the global internet develops in the coming years.