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How Do You Fit More Data into a Cable?

Internet Network

By Jayne MillerApr 23, 2019

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Google and SubCom are turning to space-division multiplexing within their new Dunant cable. The pair is angling to engineer the fastest fiber-optic cable of it's kind. (We can talk about whether or not new submarine cables are really giving us faster internet another time.)

We've got this Dunant story below, as well as finds on Facebook's potential new cable, a proposed Australia-Hong Kong link, and a long read about what it would take to physically bring down the internet.

Read on, cable fiends. Read on.

How Google is Cramming More Data into its Atlantic Cable

Google is gunning for the "world's fastest undersea data connection" with the forthcoming Dunant cable. This Wired piece explains how fiber optic networks actually work, shedding light on how Google could achieve their goal. 

U.S. Firm's Plan for Australia-China Internet Cable Leaves Huawei Trailing

SubCom is planning the most direct link yet between Australia and China via a new cable. The cable would go through Papua New Guinea, moving in on Huawei's territory. Reuters has all the details.

Could We Blow Up the Internet?

There's a lot of interest in how the internet works. Take this Motherboard piece about the possibility/likelihood of someone being able to physically bring down the internet. Tim Maughan carefully explores several hypothetical scenarios, ultimately concluding that our dear submarine cables are probably safe. 

Facebook Looks to Build Underwater Ring Around Africa

This is another story about a content provider developing a submarine cable. This time, it's Facebook and the rumored Simba cable, which would encircle the continent. Sounds like we'll be updating our list of content provider cable investments soon.

MVNO Market Maintains Upward Trajectory

The market for MVNO services remains buoyant. Customers of resellers accounted for 4.6% of all mobile users worldwide at the end of 2018. This is up from 4.3% a year earlier and less than 2% in December 2011. Pete Bell taps into our GlobalComms Database to understand what's happening with MVNOs across the country.

Think you've got something that should be on our monthly reading list? Tweet it to us @TeleGeography. 

 

Read Next

International bandwidth connected to the Middle East is growing. But that's not the end of the story. The majority of deployed bandwidth connects the region to Europe, which has been the trend for years. Here's what's happening in the region.

Pssst. We've Got a New Map: Our new submarine cable map depicts 420 cable systems and 1,106 landing stations that are currently active, under construction, or expected to be fully-funded by the end of 2021. Take a look.