Competing Visions: Network Upgrades vs. Modernization

Next month, Senior Research Manager Paul Brodsky will be taking part in a subsea-focused panel at Capacity Middle East.

This panel, titled Competing Visions, will cover network upgrades vs. network modernization, supply chain implications that have affected the industry during covid times, and what this all means for subsea architecture in the Middle East.

More Carriers, More Data: i3forum Expands Insights Offering

Today the i3forum announced the expansion of its successful Insights tool, which will now offer an Insights Light tier.

This extended offering is designed for smaller voice teams who require occasional market tracking and insight, while the flagship Insights solution remains available to large voice teams who rely on such market intelligence for day-to-day business operations.

Both levels of service are available to international carriers whether or not they are i3forum members.

Unpacking Telecom Predictions of the Past

It's one thing to make predictions. It's another to go back and assess how those predictions shook out.

One month into 2023, Mattias Fridström, Chief Evangelist at Arelion, very kindly agreed to scrutinize his 2022 forecast with us.

What Do You Get When You Cross GEO Satellites and SD-WAN?

While most planned satellite constellations used for connectivity fly in low earth orbit (LEO), some fly in geosynchronous equatorial orbit (GEO) and circle the earth from a much further distance.

Because of this distance, LEO satellites tend to have lower latency and higher bandwidth than their GEO counterparts.

So when MetTel tried to cross its SD-WAN offering with HughesNet's GEO connection, it got latency.

More on this story and our other January telecom reading recs below.

Voice Traffic: I've Fallen and I Can't Get Up

The international voice market's trajectory is down, and there's no reason to believe it's coming back.

Our recently updated TeleGeography Report and Database shows us exactly how fast traffic volumes are plummeting.

SASE and Secure

This week on TeleGeography Explains the Internet we welcome Jeremiah Ginn, Software Defined Cybersecurity Evangelist at AT&T and author of Diving into SASE.

The Panama Paper Trail: Tracking Five Years of Telecom Upheaval

Back in 2018, the Panamanian government rubber-stamped long-gestating plans to reduce the mobile market from four players to three, seeking to make better use of the country’s spectrum resources.

Despite multiple meetings, no breakthroughs were achieved, and all four operators were unwilling to concede ground.

Five years later, multiple international telecom groups have exited Panama and the authorities find themselves in the unusual position of trying to attract a new operator to fill the void.

Today, we track the key events that led to this point.

A Brief History of Networking as a Service

This week's guest on TeleGeography Explains the Internet has a deep history in networking.

Khalid Raza was involved in some of the earliest large-scale MPLS deployments. Then, after seeing the limitations of MPLS, he co-founded Viptela–diving head-first into the SD-WAN revolution.

Khalid is now the Founder and CEO of Graphiant, a Silicon Valley-based startup. In this interview, he describes how enterprise networks have changed and why we need an approach beyond MPLS and SD-WAN.

Let’s Dive Into SASE

If you've been involved in the WAN/IT infrastructure space for the past few years, you've probably heard about SASE, or Secure Access Service Edge.

The enterprise market is just beginning to integrate this new technology into network security strategy and many professionals are still broadly unfamiliar with it. As a result, it's common for WAN speakers and writers to repeatedly clarify what SASE is (and speculate on whether vendors are “SASE washing”).

In fact, our 2021 WAN Manager Survey found that only one-third of enterprises had adopted either SASE or Zero Trust. And one in ten respondents had never even heard of SASE.

Shake-up in Hungary as Vodafone Exits

U.K.-based Vodafone Group has agreed to leave the Hungarian telecom market after more than 20 years of competing in the country’s mobile and fixed sectors.